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St. Vladimir's Seminary President to be Keynote Speaker at Sacred Music Institute in July

3 hours 54 min ago

Photo: svots.eduThe Department of Sacred Music is happy to announce that The Very Rev. Dr. Chad Hatfield, President of St. Vladimir's Orthodox Theological Seminary, will be the keynote speaker at this summer's Sacred Music Institute (SMI) and Youth Music Ministry (YMM), July 12–16, 2017 at the Antiochian Village. Father Chad will be addressing the theme for the week: "Music as Ministry: Looking Outward Through Orthodox Hymnography."

For more information, please contact Paul Jabara or visit the Department of Sacred Music homepage.

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Watch a Preview: Western Orthodoxy, The Lost Daughter

Tue, 2017/05/23 - 7:37pm

The following video is the first two minutes of a new film being made about the Western Rite, also known as Western Orthodoxy. It features three of our own Antiochian priests who lead Western Rite parishes: Fr. Patrick Cardine, Fr. Alban Waggener, and Fr. James Hamrick. The full film will be made available this summer, 2017. (View the directory of Western Rite parishes in the Antiochian Archdiocese.)

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Memory Eternal! + Youssif (Joseph) Hanna

Fri, 2017/05/19 - 1:12pm

Memory Eternal! Youssif (Joseph) Hanna + 1932–2017

It is with great sadness that we announce the sudden passing of our wonderful husband, father, and grandfather at the age of 85. Beloved husband of Najwa (Sawaya) for 55 years. Loving father and father-in-law: to George and Sophie, Andrew, and Dannie, Gina, and Tasso. Most cherished Jiddo to his pride and joys: Nicholas, Philip, Joseph, William, and Gabriel. His nieces and nephews will remember their 'ammo' with fondness. He is pre-deceased by his parents, Ferris and Galia and his siblings Hasibee, Khaylek, Theo, George and Mary.

He will be most remembered for his generosity, kindness, devotion to his community and church, and his passion for his magnificent gardens.

Joe was born in Chebaa, Lebanon, and emigrated to Montreal, Canada in 1957, where he worked hard to become an accomplished businessman, achieving admirable success with recognition as a pioneer in innovation to the garment industry.

He enjoyed life to the fullest traveling extensively and spending much time with his wife at the home he adored on a quiet lake in the Laurentians. It was there that he built and lovingly maintained his large elaborate vegetable garden year after year. In the summer, it was never unusual for Joe to arrive at a neighbor or friends'home with a basket full of his garden's pickings.

Joe was a devoted member of St. George Orthodox Church having served on the parish council and the church choir for many years, including a period as the choir president. He was a member of the Archdiocese Board of Trustees and of the Order of St. Ignatius where he served as local and regional chairperson.

He dedicated himself to the creation of Camp Transfiguration, the official summer camp for the Can-Am region. He embraced his heritage and demonstrated an everlasting love for his place of birth.

Joe's good-natured caring, outspokenness, and his never-ending generosity, endeared him to his family, friends, and community. He will be forever missed.

His family is extremely grateful for the display of care and kindness by the nurses and doctors at St. Mary's Hospital.

The family received condolences at Saint George Antiochian Orthodox Church Montreal, where services were held on Thursday, May 11 and Friday, May 12, 2017. The Very Rev. Dr. Joseph F. Purpura, Economos Antony Gabriel, The Very Rev. Michel Fawaz, and Rev. Jean El Murr presided at his services.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to St. George Antiochian Orthodox Church  or the Cedar's Cancer Foundation. 

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Syrian Relief Program: Introducing DERD

Thu, 2017/05/18 - 10:29am
DERD is the only official non-profit organization of the Antiochian Patriarchate. THE SYRIAN PEOPLE ARE SUFFERING…...homes, schools, and hospitals have been demolished - loved ones have been injured - lives have been lost – families have been torn apart - the innocent have been held captive - holy places have been desecrated and destroyed….   

BUT YOU CAN HELP – GIVE DIRECTLY AND SECURELY TO SYRIAN RELIEF THROUGH DERD

In response to the love and concern expressed by many of you to His Eminence, Metropolitan Joseph regarding the crisis in Syria and the suffering of our Brothers and Sisters there, a special donation mechanism has been set up so that Antiochian Orthodox Christians and anyone else concerned about the suffering of the Syrian people can donate directly to the relief efforts through the Patriarchate of Antioch. We are pleased to announce that we now have set up a fund for making contributions directly to the relief efforts in Syria, and that you will be able to donate online.

 

The Patriarchate of Antioch, has a very effective humanitarian non-governmental organization, the Department of Ecumenical Relationships and Development (DERD) operating through out Syria. It was established in 1994 under the Thrice-Blessed Memory of Patriarch Ignatius IV (Hazim), and has been blessed to continue and expand its work under His Beatitude Patriarch John X. Its current Director is Archimandrite Dr. Alexi Chehadeh.

DERD is the largest independent local NGO operating inside Syria with 10 offices and 25 multi-service centers, such as child protection, child-friendly space, and community centers, seeking to offer help to those who are in dire need, ensuring that all efforts are made to provide services to all, in order to spread the spirit of humanity, dignity, justice, tranquility and peace among those IDPs and affected, regardless of race, religion or ethnicity. It seeks to go and have mercy, as did the Good Samaritan.

With YOUR donation, you can help them to survive.

With: $1 YOU can feed a child for one whole day.
With: $10 YOU can feed a family for a week.
With: $50 YOU can keep a family warm for one month.
With: $100 YOU can contribute to a life-saving surgery.
With: $500 YOU can send 10 children to school for one whole year.
With: $1000 YOU can facilitate the return of IDP families back to their homes through rehabilitation works.

HOW TO DONATE?

Any donation is welcome, please don't hesitate to help. Donations will be made to the Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese Syrian Relief Fund, with 100% of donations going directly to the Patriarchate for DERD. Because you are making your contribution to the Archdiocese, your contribution will be tax deductible, to the extent allowed by law. You can donate today by either:

                

 

 

Related Material

His Eminence Metropolitan Joseph's Letter (PDF)

Patriarchate Publication on the Position of the Patriarchate of Antioch and All the East on the Crisis in Syria - April 2017 (PDF)

DERD Facebook Page

 

 

 

1. Sending a check made out to the Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdioces with a memo: Syrian Relief Fund/DERD and mailing it today to :

Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdioces
Attn: Syrian Relief Fund/DERD
358 Mountain Road
Englewood, New Jersey 07631  

2. Clicking on the Donate Now button. This will direct you to our online donation form. All online donations will incur a 3% convenience processing fee which will be deducted from your total donation amount. 

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Prison Ministry Awareness Sunday is May 21

Wed, 2017/05/17 - 11:56am

The Assembly of Bishops has announced that Sunday, May 21, 2017, is Prison Ministry Awareness Sunday. "We who do not live in the darkness of a prison or jail cannot truly comprehend the incredible distress men and women prisoners live with each and every day," notes Fr. Stephen Powley, Antiochian priest and Executive Director of Orthodox Christian Prison Ministry (OCPM). "OCPM needs all our help to bring the love and light of Christ to these precious souls. The Orthodox Church, through OCPM, offers both hope and healing to those living in such distress."

Read the announcement on the Assembly website.

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Saints Constantine and Helen + May 21

Tue, 2017/05/16 - 5:02pm

O Lord, thy disciple Emperor Constantine, who saw in the sky the Sign of Thy Cross, Accepted the call that came straight from Thee, as it happened to Paul, and not from any man. He built his capital and entrusted it to Thy care. Preserve our country in everlasting peace, through the intercession of the Mother of God, for Thou art the Lover of mankind.

+ Troparion of Ss. Constantine and Helen, Tone 8

"Constantine's legacy can be seen in Christianity's transformation from a private sect into a public church that encompassed the whole of society. He put it on an institutional footing, which enabled the Church to be the leading cultural force in the ancient world."

(From Robert Arakaki's Constantine The Great: Roman Emperor, Christian Saint, History's Turning Point)

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Saints Constantine and Helen + May 21

Tue, 2017/05/16 - 5:02pm

O Lord, thy disciple Emperor Constantine, who saw in the sky the Sign of Thy Cross, Accepted the call that came straight from Thee, as it happened to Paul, and not from any man. He built his capital and entrusted it to Thy care. Preserve our country in everlasting peace, through the intercession of the Mother of God, for Thou art the Lover of mankind.

+ Troparion of Ss. Constantine and Helen, Tone 8

"Constantine's legacy can be seen in Christianity's transformation from a private sect into a public church that encompassed the whole of society. He put it on an institutional footing, which enabled the Church to be the leading cultural force in the ancient world."

(From Robert Arakaki's Constantine The Great: Roman Emperor, Christian Saint, History's Turning Point)

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Attention Church Musicians! Audition Recordings for Sacred Music Chamber Choir Due June 1

Tue, 2017/05/09 - 5:44pm

Paul Jabara, Department of Sacred Music Chairman, is searching for choristers with advanced vocal training and musical experience who will perform in a select Sacred Music Chamber Choir at the Sacred Music Institute on July 12–16, 2017 at Antiochian Village. The chamber choir will sing a variety of Orthodox hymns, both Byzantine and Choral, under the direction of Mr. Jabara.

The choir will be limited to eighteen members. Singers are asked to audition with a piece of their choice that demonstrates their technique and vocal range. The recording can be made on an iPhone or similar device, and emailed to Paul Jabara at sacredmusic@antiochian.org. The audition deadline is June 1, 2017.

The Sacred Music Chamber Choir was formed six years ago, allowing experienced choristers the opportunity to challenge themselves and perform Orthodox music of the highest calibre. Longterm plans for the Chamber Choir include the creation of a recording of Orthodox Christian hymns, and the performance of public concerts throughout the Archdiocese.

Categories: All News Feeds, General

Attention Church Musicians! Audition Recordings for Sacred Music Chamber Choir Due June 1

Tue, 2017/05/09 - 5:44pm

Paul Jabara, Department of Sacred Music Chairman, is searching for choristers with advanced vocal training and musical experience who will perform in a select Sacred Music Chamber Choir at the Sacred Music Institute on July 12–16, 2017 at Antiochian Village. The chamber choir will sing a variety of Orthodox hymns, both Byzantine and Choral, under the direction of Mr. Jabara.

The choir will be limited to eighteen members. Singers are asked to audition with a piece of their choice that demonstrates their technique and vocal range. The recording can be made on an iPhone or similar device, and emailed to Paul Jabara at sacredmusic@antiochian.org. The audition deadline is June 1, 2017.

The Sacred Music Chamber Choir was formed six years ago, allowing experienced choristers the opportunity to challenge themselves and perform Orthodox music of the highest calibre. Longterm plans for the Chamber Choir include the creation of a recording of Orthodox Christian hymns, and the performance of public concerts throughout the Archdiocese.

Categories: All News Feeds, General

Who Else Will Raise the Next Generation of Orthodox Christians? A Reflection for Mother’s Day

Tue, 2017/05/09 - 11:50am

By Fr. George H. Shalhoub

This Sunday, people throughout the United States and many places around the world will gather to honor their mothers. Many mothers will receive flowers, breakfast in bed, dinners and other acts of affection. For those who may be away from their children, they will have to be content with a phone call or a card in the mail. But, no matter how admirable this day has become for us in today’s society, honoring one’s mother should not be reduced to a one day activity, because mothers provide the foundation upon which we build our lives.

God gives every created human being a mother here on earth because He loves us. And even after our earthy mother precede us to Heaven, we still have our eternal mother (the Virgin Mary) who always keeps us in the shelter of her wings. As the late Mikhail Naimy stated, “Love is the law of God. You live that you may learn to love. You love that you may learn to live. No other lesson is required of Man.”

It is a well-known fact that Christian scripture states that the role of instructing children belongs to their father. (Eph.  6:4) However, for many of us, especially those of us who come from the Middle East, this duty belongs to the mother.  

What do mothers contribute to their children? Since God is the founder of the first family and every family on the face of this earth, the family is obligated to worship, praise and honor Him and keep His commandments. Therefore, the mother and father are an image of God to their children, and each has a different function, role and duty within the life of the family.

St. Paul stated in Ephesians, Chapter 5, that women are to be like the Holy Church: blameless and without reproach; and husbands are to be the image of Christ: serving and giving of his life to the Church. We do not enter into a debate of who is more important, more educated or makes more money. No one is greater than the other. Both were crowned, in the Sacrament of Marriage, with glory and honor and are, in God’s eyes, equal in creation.

Women of faith, in Holy Scripture, are considered to be “pillars of support” (Proverbs 9:1) and “faithful”. (I Tim 3:11) This equality is well put in the mouth of St. Paul, when he said, “Nevertheless, in the Lord woman is not independent of man, nor is man independent of woman. For as woman came from man, so also man is born of woman. But everything comes from God.”  (I Cor. 11:11-12) Since St. Paul gives this profound image of husbands and wives to be like Christ and the Church and the wife is to be like the Holy Church without distinction, Blessed Augustine once wrote, “He who does not have the church as his mother, does not have God as his father.”

 I can only speak to what my own mother contributed to my life and the lives of my siblings. I vividly recall that by the age of two, any time the church bells rang to signal a service, my mother would take me to church with her. I confess that being so young, I didn’t understand what the worship was all about, and despite being disruptive during the service, as young children are apt to be, I still felt secure and happy within the boundaries of the church. This experience left a longstanding impression on me that caused me to learn a lifetime of lessons as a son, a young man, a husband, a father, a grandfather and of course as a priest.

The lessons instilled by a mother are those emphasized in 2 Peter that says that the seeds which are implanted in our hearts, minds and souls can produce virtues or thorns. A mother’s words can either heal or scar her children. They can encourage or defeat. They can raise up, or put down. These virtues, whether good or bad determine what a child will be like as an adult, as unique individuals. We are a reflection of our parents’ attitudes, yet we bear on ourselves God’s image and likeness. Though we inherit genetics from our parents, we are original and individual in God’s eyes. All the schooling we acquire and the careers we undertake hinge on the lessons we received from our mother. She is the scale which balances life’s experiences. We either love or hate, are generous or greedy based on lessons we learn as children. Even though my mother was illiterate, she taught me the prayers of the Church which she knew by heart. I could summarize what the gospel teaches, what St. Peter insists makes a good life, and about being dedicated as a Christian based on things I learned from my mother, not through her words, but through her actions. She personified this idea from 2 Peter 1:5 “But also, for this very reason, giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue, to virtue knowledge, to knowledge self-control, to self-control perseverance, to perseverance godliness, godliness to brotherly kindness, and to brotherly kindness love.”

The calling of mothers is of self-giving for the sake of the family. St. John Chrysostom states, “A mother experiences more than one death, even though she herself will only die once. She fears for her husband; she fears for her children; again she fears for the women and children who belong to her children....For each of these, whether for loss of possessions, bodily illness or undesired misfortune, she mourns and grieves no less than those who suffer.” Our image of mothers in the Holy Church is the Virgin Mary. John of Damascus describes her calling to motherhood, “O Mother of God! If I place my confidence in thee, I shall be saved; if I am under thy protection, I have nothing to fear; for the fact of being thy client is a possession of a certainty of salvation which God grants only to those whom He intends to save.” This should be the mission of every mother.

The Bible, and especially Proverbs 6:20-23, advises us in this way, "My child, keep your father's command and do not forsake your mother's teaching. Bind them always on your heart; fasten them around your neck. When you walk, they will guide you; when you sleep, they will watch over you; when you awake, they will speak to you. For this command is a lamp, this teaching is a light and correction and instruction are the way to life." An old Arab proverb says that "Heaven bows before a mother's feet. The Book of Proverbs 31:1 also states, "Who can find a virtuous mother, she is more precious than jewels." As Henry Ward Beecher stated, "The mother's heart is the child's first school room."

Today, we are in need of the Church to raise women of faith. Who would take a bullet for you? Or catch a hand grenade? Or step in front of a train for you? Or pray that God will take her instead of her child, but a mother? “A mother’s love is something that no one can explain. It is made of deep devotion and of sacrifice and pain. It is endless and unselfish and enduring come what may, for nothing can destroy it or take that love away.” (Helen Steiner Rice)

As an adult, a man learns how to love his wife and children through the way he loves his mother and the way his mother loves him. A woman learns from the sacrifices of her mother. No one can teach decency, character and dignity but a mother. As children, our bodies are nourished through our mother’s milk and as we grow, our souls are nourished in the same way through the kindness, compassion and generosity she feeds us. 

We are dealing with a new reality of moms and dads both working to meet life’s demands and needs. The question to be asked, “Who can teach decency and respect, form character and dignity, but a mother?

A virtuous mother is so needed to instill in her children the faith we received from the saints. As Gibran Kahlil Gibran wrote, “The mother is everything - she is our consolation in sorrow, our hope in misery, and our strength in weakness. She is the source of love, mercy, sympathy, and forgiveness. He who loses his mother loses a pure soul who blesses and guards him constantly.”

On this Mother’s Day, we salute all mothers and those who are in heaven, we ask for their intercession. For those still on earth, we pray that God gives them a long and healthy life. If your mother has blessed you much, thank her. And if your mother has failed you, the best Mother’s Day gift you can give is to forgive her.

Father George Shalhoub is priest at The Antiochian Orthodox Basilica of St. Mary in Livonia, Michigan.

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Who Else Will Raise the Next Generation of Orthodox Christians? A Reflection for Mother’s Day

Tue, 2017/05/09 - 11:50am

By Fr. George H. Shalhoub

This Sunday, people throughout the United States and many places around the world will gather to honor their mothers. Many mothers will receive flowers, breakfast in bed, dinners and other acts of affection. For those who may be away from their children, they will have to be content with a phone call or a card in the mail. But, no matter how admirable this day has become for us in today’s society, honoring one’s mother should not be reduced to a one day activity, because mothers provide the foundation upon which we build our lives.

God gives every created human being a mother here on earth because He loves us. And even after our earthy mother precede us to Heaven, we still have our eternal mother (the Virgin Mary) who always keeps us in the shelter of her wings. As the late Mikhail Naimy stated, “Love is the law of God. You live that you may learn to love. You love that you may learn to live. No other lesson is required of Man.”

It is a well-known fact that Christian scripture states that the role of instructing children belongs to their father. (Eph.  6:4) However, for many of us, especially those of us who come from the Middle East, this duty belongs to the mother.  

What do mothers contribute to their children? Since God is the founder of the first family and every family on the face of this earth, the family is obligated to worship, praise and honor Him and keep His commandments. Therefore, the mother and father are an image of God to their children, and each has a different function, role and duty within the life of the family.

St. Paul stated in Ephesians, Chapter 5, that women are to be like the Holy Church: blameless and without reproach; and husbands are to be the image of Christ: serving and giving of his life to the Church. We do not enter into a debate of who is more important, more educated or makes more money. No one is greater than the other. Both were crowned, in the Sacrament of Marriage, with glory and honor and are, in God’s eyes, equal in creation.

Women of faith, in Holy Scripture, are considered to be “pillars of support” (Proverbs 9:1) and “faithful”. (I Tim 3:11) This equality is well put in the mouth of St. Paul, when he said, “Nevertheless, in the Lord woman is not independent of man, nor is man independent of woman. For as woman came from man, so also man is born of woman. But everything comes from God.”  (I Cor. 11:11-12) Since St. Paul gives this profound image of husbands and wives to be like Christ and the Church and the wife is to be like the Holy Church without distinction, Blessed Augustine once wrote, “He who does not have the church as his mother, does not have God as his father.”

 I can only speak to what my own mother contributed to my life and the lives of my siblings. I vividly recall that by the age of two, any time the church bells rang to signal a service, my mother would take me to church with her. I confess that being so young, I didn’t understand what the worship was all about, and despite being disruptive during the service, as young children are apt to be, I still felt secure and happy within the boundaries of the church. This experience left a longstanding impression on me that caused me to learn a lifetime of lessons as a son, a young man, a husband, a father, a grandfather and of course as a priest.

The lessons instilled by a mother are those emphasized in 2 Peter that says that the seeds which are implanted in our hearts, minds and souls can produce virtues or thorns. A mother’s words can either heal or scar her children. They can encourage or defeat. They can raise up, or put down. These virtues, whether good or bad determine what a child will be like as an adult, as unique individuals. We are a reflection of our parents’ attitudes, yet we bear on ourselves God’s image and likeness. Though we inherit genetics from our parents, we are original and individual in God’s eyes. All the schooling we acquire and the careers we undertake hinge on the lessons we received from our mother. She is the scale which balances life’s experiences. We either love or hate, are generous or greedy based on lessons we learn as children. Even though my mother was illiterate, she taught me the prayers of the Church which she knew by heart. I could summarize what the gospel teaches, what St. Peter insists makes a good life, and about being dedicated as a Christian based on things I learned from my mother, not through her words, but through her actions. She personified this idea from 2 Peter 1:5 “But also, for this very reason, giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue, to virtue knowledge, to knowledge self-control, to self-control perseverance, to perseverance godliness, godliness to brotherly kindness, and to brotherly kindness love.”

The calling of mothers is of self-giving for the sake of the family. St. John Chrysostom states, “A mother experiences more than one death, even though she herself will only die once. She fears for her husband; she fears for her children; again she fears for the women and children who belong to her children....For each of these, whether for loss of possessions, bodily illness or undesired misfortune, she mourns and grieves no less than those who suffer.” Our image of mothers in the Holy Church is the Virgin Mary. John of Damascus describes her calling to motherhood, “O Mother of God! If I place my confidence in thee, I shall be saved; if I am under thy protection, I have nothing to fear; for the fact of being thy client is a possession of a certainty of salvation which God grants only to those whom He intends to save.” This should be the mission of every mother.

The Bible, and especially Proverbs 6:20-23, advises us in this way, "My child, keep your father's command and do not forsake your mother's teaching. Bind them always on your heart; fasten them around your neck. When you walk, they will guide you; when you sleep, they will watch over you; when you awake, they will speak to you. For this command is a lamp, this teaching is a light and correction and instruction are the way to life." An old Arab proverb says that "Heaven bows before a mother's feet. The Book of Proverbs 31:1 also states, "Who can find a virtuous mother, she is more precious than jewels." As Henry Ward Beecher stated, "The mother's heart is the child's first school room."

Today, we are in need of the Church to raise women of faith. Who would take a bullet for you? Or catch a hand grenade? Or step in front of a train for you? Or pray that God will take her instead of her child, but a mother? “A mother’s love is something that no one can explain. It is made of deep devotion and of sacrifice and pain. It is endless and unselfish and enduring come what may, for nothing can destroy it or take that love away.” (Helen Steiner Rice)

As an adult, a man learns how to love his wife and children through the way he loves his mother and the way his mother loves him. A woman learns from the sacrifices of her mother. No one can teach decency, character and dignity but a mother. As children, our bodies are nourished through our mother’s milk and as we grow, our souls are nourished in the same way through the kindness, compassion and generosity she feeds us. 

We are dealing with a new reality of moms and dads both working to meet life’s demands and needs. The question to be asked, “Who can teach decency and respect, form character and dignity, but a mother?

A virtuous mother is so needed to instill in her children the faith we received from the saints. As Gibran Kahlil Gibran wrote, “The mother is everything - she is our consolation in sorrow, our hope in misery, and our strength in weakness. She is the source of love, mercy, sympathy, and forgiveness. He who loses his mother loses a pure soul who blesses and guards him constantly.”

On this Mother’s Day, we salute all mothers and those who are in heaven, we ask for their intercession. For those still on earth, we pray that God gives them a long and healthy life. If your mother has blessed you much, thank her. And if your mother has failed you, the best Mother’s Day gift you can give is to forgive her.

Father George Shalhoub is priest at The Antiochian Orthodox Basilica of St. Mary in Livonia, Michigan.

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Mid-Pentecost

Mon, 2017/05/08 - 5:52pm

In the midst of this Feast, O Savior, give Thou my thirsty soul to drink of the waters of true worship; for Thou didst call out to all, saying: Whosoever is thirsty, let him come to Me and drink. Wherefore, O Christ our God, Fountain of life, glory to Thee. (Apolytikion of the Feast, Tone 8)

On the Wednesday of the Paralytic, we celebrate the Feast of Mid-Pentecost.

Standing in the midst of the teachers, Christ the Messiah teacheth at Mid-Feast.

Mid-Pentecost is the midpoint of the fifty days between the Feasts of Pascha and Pentecost. In the Divine Liturgy Gospel passage, we read that “in the midst of the feast Jesus went up into the Temple, and taught” (John 7:14).

 The feast in question is the Jewish Feast of Tabernacles which commemorates the Israelites wandering in the desert for forty years, when they lived under tents and tabernacles. “Tabernacles” served as the middle link between the Jewish Passover, which recalls God’s deliverance of His people from the Egyptian pharaoh, and the Jewish Pentecost, which remembers Old Israel’s entry into the “promised land” of Mount Sinai. The risen Christ is the link for New Israel as it celebrates the New Passover (Pascha, the Resurrection) and the New Pentecost, when the Holy Spirit descended upon the disciples and apostles. When Jesus had preached in the temple, he had just healed the Paralytic Man—which the Orthodox Church recalled on the previous Sunday—and was about to give sight to the Blind Man—which the Orthodox Church will recall in ten days. The apolytikion of Mid-Pentecost announces the “waters of true worship”, which Christ will give us to drink, just as He gave the Samaritan Woman to drink; we commemorate that event on the coming Sunday. Thus, Mid-Pentecost reveals to the world that Christ will heal all of its infirmities, both physical and spiritual.

By Thy boundless mercy, O Christ our God, have mercy on us. Amen.

O Sovereign Master and Creator of all things, O Christ our God, Thou didst cry unto those present at the Judaic Mid-feast and address forth immortality’s water. Wherefore, we fall down before Thee and faithfully cry out: Grant Thy compassions unto us, O Lord, for Thou art truly the Well-spring of life for all.

With the streams of Thy Blood do Thou water my soul, which is grown dry and barren because of mine iniquities and offences, and show it forth to be fruitful in virtues. For Thou didst tell all to draw nigh Thee, O all-holy Word of God, and to draw forth the water of incorruption, which is living and which washeth away the sins of them that praise Thy glorious and divine arising. Unto them that know Thee as God, O good One, grant from on high the strength of the Spirit, which verily was borne by Thy disciples, for Thou are truly the Well-spring of life for all.

--Kontakion and Oikos of the Feast

The Living Waters of Mid-Pentecost by Fr. Stephen Rogers
Reflections on Mid-Pentecost by Vassilios Papavassiliou
St. Theophan the Recluse on Mid-Pentecost

Categories: All News Feeds, General

Mid-Pentecost

Mon, 2017/05/08 - 5:52pm

In the midst of this Feast, O Savior, give Thou my thirsty soul to drink of the waters of true worship; for Thou didst call out to all, saying: Whosoever is thirsty, let him come to Me and drink. Wherefore, O Christ our God, Fountain of life, glory to Thee. (Apolytikion of the Feast, Tone 8)

On the Wednesday of the Paralytic, we celebrate the Feast of Mid-Pentecost.

Standing in the midst of the teachers, Christ the Messiah teacheth at Mid-Feast.

Mid-Pentecost is the midpoint of the fifty days between the Feasts of Pascha and Pentecost. In the Divine Liturgy Gospel passage, we read that “in the midst of the feast Jesus went up into the Temple, and taught” (John 7:14).

 The feast in question is the Jewish Feast of Tabernacles which commemorates the Israelites wandering in the desert for forty years, when they lived under tents and tabernacles. “Tabernacles” served as the middle link between the Jewish Passover, which recalls God’s deliverance of His people from the Egyptian pharaoh, and the Jewish Pentecost, which remembers Old Israel’s entry into the “promised land” of Mount Sinai. The risen Christ is the link for New Israel as it celebrates the New Passover (Pascha, the Resurrection) and the New Pentecost, when the Holy Spirit descended upon the disciples and apostles. When Jesus had preached in the temple, he had just healed the Paralytic Man—which the Orthodox Church recalled on the previous Sunday—and was about to give sight to the Blind Man—which the Orthodox Church will recall in ten days. The apolytikion of Mid-Pentecost announces the “waters of true worship”, which Christ will give us to drink, just as He gave the Samaritan Woman to drink; we commemorate that event on the coming Sunday. Thus, Mid-Pentecost reveals to the world that Christ will heal all of its infirmities, both physical and spiritual.

By Thy boundless mercy, O Christ our God, have mercy on us. Amen.

O Sovereign Master and Creator of all things, O Christ our God, Thou didst cry unto those present at the Judaic Mid-feast and address forth immortality’s water. Wherefore, we fall down before Thee and faithfully cry out: Grant Thy compassions unto us, O Lord, for Thou art truly the Well-spring of life for all.

With the streams of Thy Blood do Thou water my soul, which is grown dry and barren because of mine iniquities and offences, and show it forth to be fruitful in virtues. For Thou didst tell all to draw nigh Thee, O all-holy Word of God, and to draw forth the water of incorruption, which is living and which washeth away the sins of them that praise Thy glorious and divine arising. Unto them that know Thee as God, O good One, grant from on high the strength of the Spirit, which verily was borne by Thy disciples, for Thou are truly the Well-spring of life for all.

--Kontakion and Oikos of the Feast

The Living Waters of Mid-Pentecost by Fr. Stephen Rogers
Reflections on Mid-Pentecost by Vassilios Papavassiliou
St. Theophan the Recluse on Mid-Pentecost

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Register Now! Sacred Music Institute and Youth Music Ministry, July 12-16

Mon, 2017/05/08 - 12:51pm

Metropolitan Joseph's letter for SMI
View the 2016 photo gallery
Register here
Download the flyer
Youth Music Ministry application

The Department of Sacred Music joyfully announces the themes for the next two Sacred Music Institutes (SMI), in which we will more deeply examine our mission: guiding chanters, choirs, and congregations to musical excellence in worship for the glory of God. There is much to learn from these topics! This summer's Institute on July 12–16, 2017, hosted by Antiochian Village, is titled "Music as Ministry: Looking Outward through Orthodox Hymnody." Next summer's SMI (July 11–15, 2018) will continue the topic with the theme "Music as Vocation: Looking Inward through Orthodox Hymnody." 

"Let us strive this year for every parish to send people to make this Institute an even greater experience for all," urges His Eminence Metropolitan Joseph in his 2017 SMI letter. 

For the first time, and in response to many requests from past participants who would like to learn more about Byzantine notation or western music theory, Optional Intensive Theory Classes will be offered this summer, beginning Wednesday, July 12 at 10 a.m. For more information please contact Emily Lowe at sacredmusicinstitute@gmail.com

We are also excited to offer longer breakout workshops, team-taught by our experienced and educated instructors, covering a variety of topics from Byzantine chant to choral directing (and even how to integrate both in your parish – yes, it can be done!) These workshops will be repeated on Thursday and Friday afternoons, so each participant will have the opportunity to attend two.

Our dynamic Youth Music Ministry promises to be more exciting, spiritually uplifting, challenging, and fun than ever before! We look forward to meeting a new group of inspiring young men and women into our midst, and welcoming back some of our “veteran” teens! For more information please contact Chris Farha at chrisfarha@cox.net, or access the application here.

Additionally, Paul Jabara, Department of Sacred Music Chairman, is searching for choristers with advanced vocal training and musical experience who will perform in a select Sacred Music Chamber Choir at the Institute. Read more about how to submit audio for your audition, by June 1.

For those who require financial assistance, a limited number of scholarships, for both adults and youth, are available. Please contact Chris Farha for details. Pricing is as follows: 

Double Occupancy $509.43
Triple Occupancy $479.43
Teen (Triple) $363.33

PLEASE make your reservations early. We had record attendees last year and used up every bed at the Village! REGISTER HERE

We expect the full schedule, course descriptions and list of presenters, to be posted by the Feast of the Ascension, May 25, 2017.

For more information, please contact Paul Jabara at sacredmusic@antiochian.org; download the flyer HERE.

AttachmentSize Metropolitan Joseph 2017 Sacred Music Institute Letter (PDF)101 KB 2017 SMI Advertisement (PDF)63.33 KB
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Metropolitan Joseph Presides Over Joyous Festal Weekend at St. George of Boston

Fri, 2017/05/05 - 1:24pm

Boston, MA – Saint George Antiochian Orthodox Church of Boston was honored to host our beloved Metropolitan Joseph, as well as Bishop John of Worcester and New England, for a weekend of joyous celebrations from April 28–30, 2017. The patronal feast of the parish wonderfully coincided with the honoring of Mr. Robert Laham for his fifty years of service to the Archdiocese, and with the Nameday of His Eminence. (View the photo gallery)

The weekend began with a special program prepared by the young people of the parish, who enthusiastically greeted Metropolitan Joseph with hugs and shouts of “Christ is risen!” as he entered the parish hall. His Eminence greatly enjoyed the performance of a skit highlighting the life and martyrdom of St. George. The performance was followed by a “pop quiz” where the young people asked questions of the hierarchs and clergy to ensure they were paying close attention!

Saturday afternoon marked an especially warm and touching commemoration of the dedicated service given to the Archdiocese by Mr. Robert Laham. The celebration took place at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Fawaz El Khoury, the Vice Chairmen of the Archdiocesan Board of Trustees. All of the speakers took note of “Bob’s” tireless efforts stewarding the finances of the Archdiocese, and the gentle, humble ways in which he offered this vital ministry. In an especially moving moment, His Eminence Metropolitan Joseph bestowed on Mr. Laham the Order of St. Raphael of Brooklyn, the highest award given by the Antiochian Archdiocese of North America.

The weekend progressed with the celebration of Great Vespers at St. George, ushering in the liturgical commemoration of the patronal feast of the parish and the Nameday of our Chief Shepherd, who is under the heavenly patronage of St. Joseph of Arimathea and celebrates on the second Sunday after Pascha. The service was beautifully chanted antiphonally by Metropolitan Joseph, Dn. John El Massih, and a choir of students from Hellenic College Holy Cross led by Kamal Hourani, a student hailing from the parish and studying at the college. Vespers was followed by a creative culinary experience dubbed “International Night” – featuring New England, Middle Eastern, Asian, and Mexican cuisines.

Hierarchical Divine Liturgy was the apex of the celebratory weekend. Metropolitan Joseph was joined by Bishop John, Protosyngellos Timothy Ferguson, Fr. Gregory Harrigle, Fr. Nicholas Belcher, and Dn. John El Massih. His Eminence left an indelible impact on all during his homily when he reminded the worshippers of the reverence and love with which his patron saint took down the immaculate body of the Savior from the cross; the Metropolitan exhorted all to receive of the precious and life-giving mysteries in a similar manner. The liturgy was followed by a banquet where His Eminence awarded Ms. Linda Ayoub with the Archdiocesan “Meritorious Service Award” for her dedication to all of the ministries of St. George – the parish council, church school, and adult fellowship, as well as co-chairing the weekend’s festivities.

One of the themes shared by His Eminence throughout the festal weekend was that of the connection of the feast of St. George to the joy of the Paschal season. As he noted, the feast is always celebrated during the days of Pascha regardless of whether or not the date falls during Great Lent. All who took part in the weekend are grateful for the radiant Paschal joy that accompanied all of the celebrations that took place. We also wish many years and sincere congratulations to the honorees of the weekend and most especially to our father and chief shepherd, Metropolitan Joseph. 

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May 2017 Issue of The Word Magazine Now Available Online

Wed, 2017/05/03 - 2:15pm
Click cover to download:  may_2017_word_for_archdiocese.pdf Magazine Date:  05/2017

Remembering Some of Our Antiochian Bishops in America, p. 5
Fr. Thomas Zain

Being Faithful in the Age After God, p. 10
Fr. Joseph Huneycutt

Fidelity in the Life of Christ, p. 14
Bishop Thomas and Peter Schweitzer

The Music of the Church: A Western Rite Perspective, p. 18
Rebecca S. Alford

An "Original Brick": Matushka Juliana Schmemann, p. 20
Shamassey Mary Honoré

Christian Education news, Communities in Action reports...and more!

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St. Emmelia Homeschool Conference Encourages and Refreshes Families

Wed, 2017/05/03 - 1:26pm

St. Emmelia Homeschool Conference, 2017

 

 

 

 

 


Christ is risen!

The St. Emmelia Homeschool Conference 2017 was a great success; glory to God for His generosity in blessing our humble efforts! The theme was "touching heaven" and we really did touch heaven in many various ways as we came together for encouragement, equipping, and refreshment in the God-ordained task of raising His children. Please visit at our website for coming updates and a report.

In the meantime, please save the dates for the next conference at Antiochian Village on April 19–22, 2018; this will be the twelfth event of its kind. The theme of the conference is "Be Not Afraid" and we're pleased to have arranged for Fr. Josiah Trenham to be our keynote speaker.

Also, please pray for this work to continue to flourish. There is serious conversation to hold a similar conference in Texas and in California.

Grateful to be your servant in the Risen Lord,

+ Fr. Noah Bushelli, Director

 

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Liturgical Texts for May Now Ready for Download

Tue, 2017/05/02 - 9:49am

The interior of Ss. Constantine and Helen Church in Nish, Serbia, the birthplace of Emperor Constantine the Great.The Renewal, or Bright, Season following Great and All-holy Pascha continues into the month of May. In the month’s third week, the Orthodox Church celebrates two important saints and a great feast of our Lord, God and Savior Jesus Christ. May’s liturgical texts, blessed by His Eminence Metropolitan Joseph, are now ready for clergy and laity to download from the Online Liturgical Guide.

The theme of water runs through the second half of Renewal Season. At the feast of Mid-Pentecost, we ask our Savior to quench our thirsty souls with “the waters of true worship,” coming from Christ Himself, the “Fountain of life” (apolytikion of Mid-Pentecost). The ancient church (and some of our congregations today) would have just celebrated the soul-cleansing baptisms of catechumens on Holy Saturday, and so we all call upon our Lord to refresh us with His wisdom as we maintain our baptismal purity.

Our baptisms cleanse and heal our bodies as well, which are made mostly of life-sustaining water, as shown in the fourth, fifth and sixth Sundays of Pascha. On the Sunday of the Paralytic, Christ heals at the Sheep’s Pool the man who was paralyzed for 38 years (John 5:1-15). On the Sunday of the Samaritan Woman, Christ tells St. Photeini at Jacob’s Well that she can partake of the “living water,” Christ Himself, and never thirst again (John 4:5-42). On the Sunday of the Blind Man, Christ reveals His creative power and gives eyeballs to the man born without them, and sends him to wash in the Pool of Siloam where he gains his sight (John 9:1-38).

This year, the Sunday of the Blind Man coincides with the commemoration of the holy, glorious, God-crowned and great Sovereigns Constantine and Helen, the Equals to the Apostles (May 21). The Emperor Constantine abolished the persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire in his Edict of Milan in 313. Then, he adopted their faith. His pious mother, Helen, visited Jerusalem, discovered the Honorable Cross of the Lord, built the Church of the Resurrection on Golgotha and other churches throughout the Holy Land (Synaxarion at Orthros).

A few days later, on the fortieth day (or sixth Thursday) after Pascha, the Orthodox Church celebrates the great feast of the Ascension of our Lord into heaven. Even though He is seated at the right hand of God the Father, Christ promised that He would still be with His disciples and all of us, and no one could be against us (kontakion of the Ascension). This great feast prefigures our ascension into heaven to sit next to God Himself.

On the Sunday following the Ascension, the Orthodox Church commemorates the Holy Fathers of the First Ecumenical Council in Nicaea in 325. Once St. Constantine ended the state-sanctioned persecution of the Church, her clergy and laity began to fight over doctrine and the true natures of God in Trinity. St. Constantine called the council which abolished the heretic Arius and his false teaching that the Word was not God consubstantial with the Father, but that He was created as a stranger to the Substance of the Father and His glory (Synaxarion at Orthros). This council also gave us “The Creed” which Orthodox Christians recite to this day.

The Online Liturgical Guide, produced by the Committee on Liturgics, provides the official, uniform word-for-word texts to be used for the divine services in all parishes across the Archdiocese. Should you have any questions, please contact Subdeacon Peter Samore at service_texts@antiochianladiocese.org.

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Memory Eternal! + Janna Esber Georges

Fri, 2017/04/28 - 6:39pm

Memory eternal! 

Janna Esber Georges, mother of Khouria Lynn Gabriel, reposed in the Lord on Tuesday, April 25th, 2017. She passed into eternity at home, surrounded by her family: Fr. Antony Gabriel, Kh. Lynn, David, Mark and Tamara, Ryan, Jeanne Habib, and Pam Rosenberg. She is also survived by two sisters, Laurice Neam and Audrey Herbergs; and many loving nephews and nieces. Touching many lives, she will be deeply missed. 

Janna was born in Damascus, Syria on January 2, 1920, as Janna Esber. Her church was Ss. Peter and Paul in Maryland, with Fr. George Rados.

At her request arrangements will be private. A woman of great faith, she left in the loving embrace of Christ!  

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Blessed Name's Day to Metropolitan Joseph!

Thu, 2017/04/27 - 2:00pm

We extend our prayers and love to His Eminence Metropolitan Joseph on the occasion of his Name's Day on April 30, 2017 (St. Joseph of Arimathea, Second Sunday after Pascha). May God grant him many years!

Learn more about Joseph of Arimathea
Read about Metropolitan Joseph

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